Athletic Collaborations

Cardinal Spotlight: Norman Bellard

norman bellard spotlight

Norman Bellard, assistant to the president for Community Relations/Athletic Program Liaison, sat down with LamarCardinals.com for a short interview.


  • What do you do at Lamar?

    From a formal standpoint my title is Assistant to the President for Community Relations/Athletic Program Liaison. Looking at the athletics part first, my role is to primarily assist with all aspects of athletic operations, and more specifically from a fundraising standpoint. Obviously, that would go toward the upgrading of facilities. We've made some headway in basketball with a new videoboard, sound system and lights – the new lighting and sounds system came from the university, but the videoboard was due to a very generous donor. We are also currently working on renovating the men's and women's basketball locker rooms from the same donor responsible for the videoboard – Susan Conn McCurry. I'm also be working with our new Director of Athletics, Marco Born, trying to secure new money for baseball renovations.

    The community relations aspect of my job is the bulk of my position that President Evans appointed me to in March 2015. He wanted to concentrate on our immediate neighborhood which is South Park. I can remember when I was in high school, and my playing days here at Lamar, South Park was one of the more prominent, if not the most prominent area in Beaumont. Because of hurricanes, property owners moving on or moving out of the area and some neglect the community had deteriorated. President Evans appointed a five-member safety task force here on campus and we began the process of trying to identify spears of influence not only in South Park but all of Beaumont. We started with five internal appointees and then added seven community leaders who agreed to come aboard and help us. Since March 2015, we have grown from the original five, to 12 and we now have 50 serving on the committee. It is a great cross-section of city officials, administrators, the city police department, clergy, business owners and South Park residents working toward the same goal. The ultimate goal is the revitalization of South Park.

    Over the course of the past three years, we have focused on small victories. I think we have done a pretty good job of that in a short period of time, and we will keep putting one foot in front of the other. We came up with a little theme for what we're trying to accomplish: Reimagine, Rebuild and Revitalize. Our committee has focused on several areas which are safety for the LU community and the South Park neighborhoods, infrastructure – which has included better lighting, street repairs and identifying approximately 80 dilapidated structures that needed attention – and community engagement.

    In November, I also took on the role of interim Director of Athletics. When the coach calls a play you run the play. So, when Dr. Evans called and asked me to fill in on an interim basis and I gladly accepted. The goal there was to carry the torch until the committee and Dr. Evans selected a new AD. I enjoyed that time because it was very challenging, but at the same time it was very rewarding. I got to know the athletics staff better, and not the just the coaches, but the entire athletic department staff. To put things in football terms, I simply tried to carry the ball without fumbling it. It was what our President needed me to do at the time and if he were to come to me with a different challenge, I would gladly accept that as well.

  • How did you get started in this career field?
    I've been here 18 years, and 14 of that was spent with student affairs serving in various senior administrative positions. Then President Evans and I met in the latter part in 2014 to discuss his vision of community relations. I didn't have a lot of community relations experience, but I did know the community really well. I've lived here for 40-plus years, so I know the pulse of Beaumont and Jefferson County, and I believe that is what the President viewed as one of my strongest assets. I use that experience of being local for 40-plus years to help us achieve the victories that we've had since our inception.
  • What's a typical day look like for you?
    Man's best laid plans go astray. The best example of a typical day for me would be this morning. I started my day by wearing the community relations hat meeting with the city manager, city engineer and the community development director about plans moving forward with development and infrastructure aspects to improve the South Park neighborhood. The best way to describe it is, there is no typical day in this office, but I know what I'm trying to accomplish in the next seven days and the next 30 days. There is a balance between community relations and a liaison with athletics. For example, the focus for the next 30 days is to make sure we put on a successful football banquet next month. Plus we are focusing on season ticket sells for upcoming sports, corporate sponsorships and Cardinals Club memberships. We're also planning men's and women's basketball banquets as well as reunions for volleyball, basketball and providing assistance with the baseball reunion
  • What are some of the rewards you feel come from working in this position?
    The rewards of either side of this job whether you're referring to the community or athletics side is to be of service to people. I've always prided my professional career on being able to give back to the community, whether it was voluntary role with YMCA, Salvation Army or the Boys' and Girls' Club or any of the civic organizations that I've been a member of. To be able to assist people to make South Park a safer area, making the community more enjoyable for their kids, assist with BISD administrators, counselors and teachers to help them achieve what they need with their kids at Pietzsch-MacArthur Elementary School or South Park Middle School is very important to me. I pride myself on being able to give back to a community that has been so good to me. I also try to be that coach/teacher/school administrator that helped me along the way.
  • You originally came to LU as an athlete. Tell us about your career and what stands out to you the most during your playing days?
    I initially signed with a rival of Lamar University. During the summer after I signed with Sam Houston State the athletics director retired and Sam hired a retired Army general as its new AD. Needless to say, he had several rules that I wasn't too fond of at the time. Back in those days, I had an afro and he wanted all of us to cut our hair, and he had a very early curfew for his players so I immediately sought to come back home. Jack Martin was the coach here at the time and I was lucky that Sam Houston released me and Jack was willing to bring me back home. It turned out for the best. I had a pretty good career here, my parents were happy I was back and my wife of soon-to-be 40 years, who was my girlfriend at the time, was happy I was back home.

    Jack retired after my sophomore year and then LU hired Billy Tubbs, and at that point we started playing "Billy Ball." He believed that if you passed the ball more than three times it was a stall, and he was never going to call a stall. We averaged right around 89 points per game and jumped as high as No. 5 in the national rankings. We were very tough at home and put together the start of what became an 80-game home win streak, which went on to be one of the longest in the country. I was also part of conference titles in both my junior and senior years. My senior year was the first year the Southland received an automatic bid to the NCAA Championships and we were sent to Murfreesboro, Tenn., where we faced the University of Detroit in the opening round. Detroit was ranked 17th in the nation at the time and three of their starters would go on to be drafted by the NBA later that summer. We beat Detroit and one of our posts – Clarence Kea – had 33 points and 19 rebounds in that game. That was a Friday night and we were real excited after the game. Billy (Tubbs) and Clarence were on the postgame interview and said "Detroit thought they were going to be playing in an all Michigan second round but we sent them home. Bring on Michigan State!" That Spartan team had a 19-year old phenom by the name of Magic Johnson and they went on to defeat Larry Bird and Indiana State for the National Championship. It was only after the Michigan State game that we found out Magic had seen our postgame interview and said it fired him up.

    At that time though, the Southland was only six teams – LU, McNeese State, Southwestern Louisiana (now UL-Lafayette), Louisiana Tech, Arkansas State and Texas-Arlington. It was a small but concise and competitive conference. We love to play against McNeese and USL. They were our arch rivals. We loved going to Lafayette and Lake Charles. Those games, both home and away, were always standing room only.

Fun Facts Sheet about Norman Bellard

  • Birthplace: Lafayette, La., and I attended elementary school in Lake Charles, so our games against McNeese and USL take on even more meaning for me.
  • College: Lamar University
  • Experience in college athletics: 4 years as a player, 4th year in athletics and 14 years with student affairs
  • Favorite Sports Team: I bleed Lamar Red and White! In the NFL I've always been a fan of the Cowboys. In the NBA, I was a Michael Jordan fan so I rooted for the Chicago Bulls, but now I enjoy watching the Golden State Warriors.
  • Favorite Phrase: "If I can help somebody as I pass along, If I can cheer somebody with a word or a song, If I can show someone he's traveling wrong, Then my living will not be in vain."
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

https://lamarcardinals.com/news/2018/7/18/general-cardinal-spotlight-norman-bellard.aspx

Collaborations

C.W. and Dorothy Anne Conn video board provided by Susan Conn McCurry

scoreboard donated by Roger and Susan Conn-McCurry

Lamar University in Beaumont, TX partnered with Nevco to enhance their Basketball arena with a new Scoring Solution; a center-hung 4-Face Video Display featuring (4) 7.58’H x 11.81’W 6mm Full Color LED Video Displays topped with Illuminated Signs with Wedge Panels featuring 3D Rear-Lit Logos in each corner. (2) 10mm Full Color LED Video Rings are placed prominently above and below the main display, and a custom imprinted video ring bottom completes the upgrades.


Keynote Speakers, Athletic Banquets

football kickoff Key note speaker joe washington

September 1, the Cardinals are excited to be able to announce that the season will once again unofficially open with a community kickoff a few days before on Sunday, August 26. Making this year's community event even more special is the addition of football legend Joe Washington as the keynote speaker.
 
Joe Washington is a man who needs no introduction in Southeast Texas. Born in Crockett, Texas, Washington graduated from what was then Abraham Lincoln High School in Port Arthur, where his father coached football. He played four years at the University of Oklahoma where he accrued over 4,000 yards from scrimmage and was a consensus All-American in his junior and senior seasons.
 
Washington was drafted fourth overall in the 1976 NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers, where he played one season before being traded to the Baltimore Colts. He played three seasons with the Colts, including his 1979 Pro Bowl season. His most notable moment with the Colts came on September 18, 1978 when he threw a touchdown, caught a touchdown, and returned a kickoff for a touchdown, becoming the only NFL player to ever do all three in one game.
 
Washington spent the next three years with the Washington Redskins, and was named one of the 70 Greatest Redskins by the organization. He played in both Super Bowl XVII and Super Bowl XVIII with the Redskins as well before concluding his NFL career with the Atlanta Falcons. He retired following the 1985 season with 4,839 career rushing yards and 3,413 receiving yards and 30 touchdowns.
 
Washington didn't sit idly by after his NFL retirement either; he currently works as a financial advisor for Wells Fargo and fielded a NASCAR Busch Series team with NBA Hall of Famer Julius Erving from 1998-2000.

community comes out to support launch of new basketball season at tip off banquetNearly 500 fans arrived at the Montagne Center Sunday evening for the annual Lamar University Football Kickoff Banquet. The official kickoff to a new season, fans of the Red and White got their first look at 2018 LU football players and coaches.
 
In addition to meeting the team, fans were treated to an inspirational message by Port Arthur's very own Joe Washington. A local sports hero who went on to fame at the game's highest levels, Washington graduated from Port Arthur's Lincoln High School where his father coached football. Washington would go on to play four years at the University of Oklahoma where he accrued over 4,000 yards from scrimmage and was a consensus All-American in his junior and senior seasons.
 
Washington was drafted fourth overall in the 1976 NFL Draft by the San Diego Chargers, where he played one season before being traded to the Baltimore Colts. He played three seasons with the Colts, including his 1979 Pro Bowl season. His most notable moment with the Colts came on September 18, 1978 when he threw a touchdown, caught a touchdown and returned a kickoff for a score, becoming the only NFL player to ever do all three in one game. He also spent time with the Washington Redskins and Atlanta Falcons.
 
In addition, to meeting 2018 Cardinals and Joe Washington, fans also had an opportunity to bid on several items in a silent auction.
 

Joe Washington, Jr. Short Bio

  • Graduated from Lincoln High School in Port Arthur where his father Joe Sr. coached him
  • Joe had a stellar college football career at the Univerisity of Oklahoma where he was a two-time first-team All-American.
  • NCAA Football National Champions 1974 & 1975
  • NCAA Football player of the Year in 1974
  • He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame
  • Joe was the 4th player drafted in the 1st round of the '76 NFL draft
  • Joe was the NFL receptions leader in 1979 with 82 receptions and was selected as an All-Pro that same year
  • Joe's most memorable performance as an NFL pro was in 1978 as a Baltimore Colt. Baltimore defeated the New England Patriots 34-27 on Monday Night Football.
  • Joe had a hand in three of the four touchdowns scored by the Colts in the fourth quarter. He helped lead off the scoring by throwing a 54-yard option pass.  Joe followed that up with a 23 yard TD catch; Joe then broke a 27-27 deadlock by scoring the game-winner on a 90-yard kickoff return in a driving rainstorm.
  • Joe remains the only NFL player to ever throw a touchdown, catch a touchdown and return a kickoff for a TD in a single game.

A Night with Julius Erving, 2019 Men and Women's Tip-Off Banquet

Dr. Juilus Irving guest speaker at tip off banquet Prior to speaking to the numerous Cardinal fans who made their way into the Montagne Center, Erving met with both the LU men's and women's basketball teams before taking a short time to meet with members of the media. He also attended a VIP reception prior to the start of the banquet.

The event, which also serves as a fundraiser for both the men's and women's basketball teams, also consisted of a silent auction which included numerous items autographed by Erving.

Erving changed the way the game of basketball was played. Considered a wizard of the game, Erving wowed fans with high-flying artistry that usually ended with a powerful dunk. His professional career began in the American Basketball Association (ABA) with the Virginia Squires and the New York Nets. Erving spent five seasons in the ABA and following its merger with the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1976 he spent 11 years with the Philadelphia 76ers leading them to the 1983 NBA title.

In five ABA seasons, Erving won three scoring titles, three MVP awards and guided his teams to two championships. During his 11 seasons in the NBA, Erving was named to the all-star team each year, named league MVP in 1981 and was a five-time member of the All-NBA First Team. For his career, he scored more than 30,000 points, averaging 22 points per game with the 76ers. In 1993, Erving was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Julius “Dr. J” Erving Career Highlights

  • Basketball Hall of Fame
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame
  • NBA Champion (1983)
  • Two-Time ABA Champion (1974 and 1976)
  • NBA Most Valuable Player (1981)
  • Three-Time ABA Most Valuable Player
  • 11-Time NBA All-Star
  • Five-Time ABA All-Star
  • Two-Time NBA All-Star Game MVP
  • Five-Time All-NBA First Team
  • Two-Time All-NBA Second Team
  • Four-Time All-ABA First Team
  • All-ABA Second-Team Selection
  • ABA All-Defensive First Team
  • ABA All-Rookie First Team
  • NBA 35th Anniversary Team
  • NBA 50th Anniversary Team
  • ABA All-Time Team
  • ABA Slam Dunk Champion
  • Jersey #32 Retired by the Brooklyn Nets
  • Jersey #6 Retired by Philadelphia 76ers
  • Career ABA and NBA Stats
  • Points - 30,026 (24.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds - 10,525 (8.5 rpg)
  • Assists - 5,176 (4.2 apg)

 

Locker Room Renovations

 Men's & Women's Locker Room


Jersey Retirements

2018

Lamar University will honor three of the greatest players in the history of the LU program when the jerseys of Carolyn Ford, Kalis Loyd and Carol Sims will be retired at the halftime of Saturday's game against Stephen F. Austin. The trio will be the first LU women's basketball players to be so honored.Lamar University will honor three of the greatest players in the history of the LU program when the jerseys of Carolyn Ford, Kalis Loyd and Carol Sims will be retired at the halftime of Saturday's game against Stephen F. Austin. The trio will be the first LU women's basketball players to be so honored.

LU to honor 3 women's hoops legends Saturday

Lamar University will honor three of the greatest players in the history of the LU program when the jerseys of Carolyn Ford, Kalis Loyd and Carol Sims will be retired at the halftime of Saturday's game against Stephen F. Austin. The trio will be the first LU women's basketball players to be so honored.
 
"Lamar University has a proud tradition of excellence in women's athletics, especially on the basketball court. We are proud to be honoring these three former standouts who helped us build such a strong tradition," said Norman Bellard, LU's interim director of athletics. "Carolyn, Kalis and Carol were successful on the court and in the classroom, and now they are continuing that success in their careers. I can't think of three more deserving women to be honored this weekend."
 
Ford, who played for LU from the 1978-79 through 1981-82 seasons, remains the only player in program history with more than 1,000 rebounds. She ended her career with 1,056 points and 1,052 rebounds. She was a recipient of the 1981 Babe Didrikson Zaharias Award, given to the top senior-to-be female student-athlete at LU.
 
Loyd, who played for the Cardinals from the 2009-10 through 2012-13 seasons, is LU's all-time leading scorer with 1,967 points. She is currently fifth all-time in rebounding at LU with 842 boards. Her combined total of 2,809 points and rebounds is the highest in program history. She was a three-time first-team All-Southland Conference selection. Loyd won the Zaharias Award in 2012.
 
Sims, who played at LU from the 1973-74 through 1976-77 seasons, compiled 1,571 points in her career, which is third on LU's all-time list. Her career average of 15.1 points per game is in the top-10 all-time at LU, an impressive figure for a career that was before the 3-point line was introduced. Sims played a pivotal role in leading LU to the Texas Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women zone championship in 1976. The Cardinals appeared in AIAW postseason competition in each of the four years Sims played.
 

 

2019

Jersey Retirement and Alumni Recognition Natalie Smith (née Sarver) played for Lamar from 1999-2002, and was named to the All-Southland Conference team each of her four seasons as a Cardinal. She was named the 2002 Southland Player of the Year and took home the 2002 Babe Zaharias Award. Her contributions in the postseason were also notable, earning her All-Tournament honors in 2000 and 2002. Jersey Retirement and Alumni Recognition Natalie Smith (née Sarver) played for Lamar from 1999-2002, and was named to the All-Southland Conference team each of her four seasons as a Cardinal. She was named the 2002 Southland Player of the Year and took home the 2002 Babe Zaharias Award. Her contributions in the postseason were also notable, earning her All-Tournament honors in 2000 and 2002. Jersey Retirement and Alumni Recognition Natalie Smith (née Sarver) played for Lamar from 1999-2002, and was named to the All-Southland Conference team each of her four seasons as a Cardinal. She was named the 2002 Southland Player of the Year and took home the 2002 Babe Zaharias Award. Her contributions in the postseason were also notable, earning her All-Tournament honors in 2000 and 2002.

Cards Honor Legend, Host Privateers Saturday

Fresh off the heels of an impressive five-set rally on Thursday, Lamar University's volleyball team returns to McDonald Gymnasium this Saturday with a dual purpose. The Cards will host the University of New Orleans and look to move up the Southland Conference leader board, and Big Red will honor the accomplishments of several legendary Cardinals, including the jersey retirement of Natalie Smith (née Sarver).

Jersey Retirement and Alumni Recognition
Natalie Smith (née Sarver) played for Lamar from 1999-2002, and was named to the All-Southland Conference team each of her four seasons as a Cardinal. She was named the 2002 Southland Player of the Year and took home the 2002 Babe Zaharias Award. Her contributions in the postseason were also notable, earning her All-Tournament honors in 2000 and 2002.
 
Smith ranks among the best to ever wear an LU uniform in several statistical categories, including second and 10th, respectively, in single-season kills, first and fifth, respectively, in single-season attacks, and third and 10th, respectively, in single-season digs. She holds the Big Red record for career kills with 1,906 and career attacks with 5,053, and she also holds the career record for digs with 1,613. Sarver also holds the Cardinal record for kills in a game with 34, a number she achieved twice.
 
Due to her many accomplishments both on and off the court, Lamar Athletics is proud to make Natalie Smith's jersey the first volleyball number to be retired in program history.

Joining Smith will be over two dozen other Cardinal volleyball alumni, reaching back all the way to the 1971 season. Smith's jersey retirement will take place in a pre-game ceremony at approximately 12:45 p.m., and the alumni recognition is scheduled between Sets 2 and 3 of Saturday's match. All times are subject to change. 

https://lamarcardinals.com/news/2018/10/5/volleyball-cards-honor-legend-host-privateers-saturday.aspx

  

James Gulley 

A legend of Lamar Cardinals basketball, James Gulley came to L-U from Newton where he immediately donned the No. 54 – a number that became synonymous with dominant post play in the Southland and American South Conferences. Named to Hall of Honor       A legend of Lamar Cardinals basketball, James Gulley came to L-U from Newton where he immediately donned the No. 54 – a number that became synonymous with dominant post play in the Southland and American South Conferences. Named to Hall of Honor    A legend of Lamar Cardinals basketball, James Gulley came to L-U from Newton where he immediately donned the No. 54 – a number that became synonymous with dominant post play in the Southland and American South Conferences. Named to Hall of Honor

 https://lamarcardinals.com/honors/cardinal-hall-of-honor/james-gulley/172

A legend of Lamar Cardinals basketball, James Gulley came to L-U from Newton where he immediately donned the No. 54 – a number that became synonymous with dominant post play in the Southland and American South Conferences.

Big Red rattled off 72 wins during his career, including two 20-win seasons, and two trips to the postseason, which included an opening-round victory over Houston in the 1985 NIT. Gulley became just the 10th player in program history to record 1,000 points and when his career was over he ranked third on the school’s all-time list in scoring, rebounds and made field goals – marks that still stand to this day.

A four-time all-conference selection, Gulley garnered Southland Conference Newcomer of the Year honors in 1985. A former league leader in rebounds, Gulley graduated from Lamar averaging better than 16 points and nearly nine rebounds per game. He knocked down 53-percent of his field goal attempts and converted better than 72 percent of his free throws during his time in a Red and White uniform.

Ladies and Gentlemen, No. 54 James Gulley.

2019 Hall of Honor

The Lamar University athletics department is set to induct eight new members into the Cardinals' Hall of Honor on Saturday, Oct. 5 during LU Hall of Fame Weekend. The newest members of the Hall of Honor include Alvin Brooks (men's basketball, 1979-81), Vernon Glass (football coach, 1963-75), Joseph Bowser (football and track & field, 1971-73), Jordan Foster (baseball, 2001-04), Larry Jackson (track & field, 1977-80), Natalie Sarver (volleyball, 1999-02), James Gulley (men's basketball, 1984-88) and Kalis Loyd (women's basketball, 2009-13).

Hall of Honor Set to Induct Eight New Members

The Lamar University athletics department is set to induct eight new members into the Cardinals' Hall of Honor on Saturday, Oct. 5 during LU Hall of Fame Weekend. The newest members of the Hall of Honor include Alvin Brooks (men's basketball, 1979-81), Vernon Glass (football coach, 1963-75), Joseph Bowser (football and track & field, 1971-73), Jordan Foster (baseball, 2001-04), Larry Jackson (track & field, 1977-80), Natalie Sarver (volleyball, 1999-02), James Gulley (men's basketball, 1984-88) and Kalis Loyd (women's basketball, 2009-13).
 
"We're extremely honored to be announcing the 2019 Cardinal Hall of Honor class," said Director of Athletics Marco Born. "This group of eight individuals is a wide reaching group that includes several decades of LU athletic achievement, over numerous different sports. Through their hard work over the years, they helped create a standard of success that current athletes seek to achieve."
 
The 2019 class is the largest LU induction since 1997 (when LU also inducted eight). There is only one induction class that was larger than LU's 2019 class and that came in 1973 – the Hall of Honor's inaugural class.
 
From the all-time winningest football coach in LU history, to a pass-first point guard who led the Red and White to its greatest run of success and arguably the best volleyball player to ever don the Cardinals' colors, the 2019 class represents six decades of LU athletics, six different sports, one multi-sport athlete and a former head coach. The class also includes three athletes who have had their jerseys retired from their respective sports – Loyd, Sarver and Gulley.
 
The class will officially be inducted Saturday, Oct. 5, at a reception on campus prior to the Cardinals football game against Abilene Christian. The inductees will also be honored at halftime of the game against the Wildcats.
 
The Cardinals' game against ACU will kick off at 6 p.m. from Provost Umphrey Stadium.

 

2019 Cardinals' Hall of Honor Inductee Bios


Alvin Brooks (Men's Basketball, 1979-81)

In just two short seasons with the Cardinals, Brooks became the school's all-time leader in assists with 432.A pass-first point guard, Brooks set the stage for his teammates to be in the spotlight, playing with six All-Southland selections, including four first-teamers. Brooks 432 assists were so impressive that he still ranks second all-time at LU.As a senior, Brooks set the LU single-season assist record with 249 (8.3 apg) assists. During his two seasons on campus, Brooks guided the Cardinals to a 47-16 (.746) record, two conference titles and a 3-2 (.400) mark in the NCAA tournament. A second-team All-Southland selection as a senior, Brooks averaged better than 10 points per game during his career.

Vernon Glass (Football Coach, 1963-75)
As the head coach of the Cardinals for 13 seasons, Glass became the program's third head coach to coach the University as a four-year institution. Glass guided the program through the transition from NCAA independent status into the Southland Conference and was two-time Southland Conference Coach of the Year. The Cardinals won the Southland title in its first three years as part of the league. Glass would go on to win four conference titles during his time at Lamar University and also posted three Southland runner-up finishes, recorded eight wins in 1972 and 1974, which still stand as the single-season school record for wins in a season, as a four-year institution. Glass is also the school's all-time winningest head coach (four-year institution) with 68 career wins. He produced 47 all-conference athletes. He also produced one All-American, one SLC Defensive Player of the Year and the school's first ever Senior Bowl invitee.

Joseph Bowser (Football and Track & Field, 1971-73)
Bowser was a member of the Southland Conference Football All-Decade Team (1970s), a two-time All-Southland Conference selection, a three-year letter winner in football and track & field. Bowser led the team in receptions and receiving yards in each of his three seasons. He finished his career 93 catches for 1,492 yards and 12 touchdowns and averaged nearly 16 yards per reception during his career. Bowswer still ranks among the school's all-time top 10 in career receiving yards. He was a 1973 free agent signee of the Dallas Cowboys and member of the Cardinals' 1971 SLC Track and Field team.

Jordan Foster (Baseball, 2001-04)
A four-year letter winner, Foster was a member of the Southland Conference's All-Decade Team (2000s). He was a two-time ABCA All-South-Central Region selection, who garnered All-America honors in 2003.That year Foster was named to the Collegiate Baseball, Baseball America, ABCA All-America and NCBWA All-America teams. Foster was also a two-time All-Southland Conference selection who garnered first-team honors in 2003 and a two-time Southland All-Tournament selection, including tournament MVP honors in 2004. Foster was a two-time Al Vincent Award recipient and the second player in program history to hit .400 in a season (.417 in 2003). He was the school’s all-time leader with 256 hits and 63 doubles and the second all-time in school history with a .374 career batting average. Foster tied for fourth all-time at LU with 165 runs batted in and also holds the school single-season record for hits (96), batting average (.417) and doubles (29). He was a 2004 24th-round selection by the Detroit Tigers.

Larry Jackson (Track & Field, 1977-80)
Jackson was a 1978 Indoor All-America selection who received multiple All-Southland Conference honors. He was named team co-captain in 1980, ran the 880-yard leg of the school-record sprint medley relay team at the Baylor Relays and the school-record time was ranked among the nation's top 10. He guided the Cardinals to three consecutive outdoor conference titles (1978-80), sparking a run of nine consecutive conference championships. The nine-straight league outdoor titles remain the most dominant run by a men's team in SLC history. He also guided the LU 4x400-meter relay team to the Southland Outdoor title in 1978 and 1979.A former USTFF champion, Jackson helped lead Lamar University to the 1978 NCAA Outdoor Championships in the 1,600-meter relay, and he qualified for the USTFF Championships in the 880-yard run and as a member of the 4x880-yard relay team.

Natalie Sarver (Volleyball, 1999-2002)
Sarver is one of the greatest players to ever don the Red and White uniform. She was a four-year letter winner who guided the Cardinals to 93 wins and the 2001 Southland Conference Championship. She was a four-time All-Southland Conference selection, a former Babe Zaharias Award winner and the Southland Player of the Year following her senior season. Sarver was a two-time SLC all-tournament team selection, who graduated as the school's all-time leader in kills and digs. She also set the program's single-match record for kills and is still ranked among the school's single-season top 10 list in several categories.

James Gulley (Men's Basketball, 1984-88)
Gulley was a four-year letter winner who guided the Cardinals to 72 victories, including two, 20-win seasons and two trips to the postseason, which included an opening-round victory over Houston in the 1985 NIT. One of the premier scorers and rebounders during his career, Gulley played in 113 games during his four seasons scoring 1,832 points (16.2 ppg), pulling down 967 rebounds (8.6 rpg) and recording 719 field goals. All three marks still rank third all-time in program history. When Gulley scored his 1,000th-point he was just the 10th player in LU history to do so. As a four-time, all-conference selection, Gulley was named 1985 SLC Newcomer of the Year.

Kalis Loyd (Women's Basketball, 2009-13)
Loyd was a four-year letter winner who played for Larry Tidwell. She helped lead the Cardinals to a 70-42 record over that stretch. During her freshman season, the Cardinals were the Southland Conference regular season and SLC tournament champions clinching the league's automatic berth to the NCAA Tournament. A three-time First-Team All-SLC selection, Loyd left her mark on the women's basketball program by becoming the school's all-time leading scorer with 1,967 points – a mark which still stands. Besides scoring, Loyd ranks sixth in school history collecting 842 rebounds. For her career, Loyd played in 127 games, dished out 371 assists, had 282 steals and recorded 52 blocks, while shooting 46 percent from the floor.

 

https://lamarcardinals.com/news/2019/8/14/baseball-hall-of-honor-set-to-induct-eight-new-members.aspx


2019 Men & Women's Basketball Tip-Off

5,000 BISD students, teachers and administrators came out to cheer on the cardinals!

BISD was partnered with Lamar Athletics for its 2nd Annual Education Day. This special event provided students with the opportunity to attend a Lamar University basketball game, an experience many students had not had. Students were chosen to attend based on their ability to achieve personal and campus goals. It was a wonderful way to reward students for their hard work. The event was designed to build excitement so students would feel encouraged to continue to strive for success as well as consider attending Lamar University in the future.