Department of Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services

Central Office Location: Office 120 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Building

Phone: (409) 880-8663

Department Chair: Dr. Jill Killough, (409) 880-8665, jill.killough@lamar.edu

Administrative Associate Sr.: Kent O'Quinn, (409) 880-8663, kent.oquinn@lamar.edu

Student Success Liason and Academic Coordinator: Marie Panchot, (409) 880-8670, mpanchot@lamar.edu

Department Description

The Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services is dedicated to servicing and creating global consumers.

Mission

We are characterized by professional disciplines bound by the common them of rendering service to individuals, families, and communities, addressing fundamental human needs.

We serve capable students and equip them with the knowledge and marketable skills to raise the quality of life and render services at the personal, family, community and global levels.

Values of the department are:

  • Quality teaching
  • Innovative curriculum
  • Integration of technology
  • Experiential learning
  • Evidence-based research

Faculty

Professor:

Dr. Jau-Jiin Chen, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8664, jjchen@lamar.edu

Dr. Molly J. Dahm, Hospitality Administration, (409) 880-1744, molly.dahm@lamar.edu

Dr. Tammy Henderson, Family Studies, (409) 880-7243, tammylhenderson@lamar.edu

Dr. Amy Shows, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-7962, amy.shows@lamar.edu

Associate Professors:

Dr. Connie Ruiz, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8668, ruizcs@lamar.edu

Dr. Kimberly Wallet, Family Studies, (409) 880-8970, kawalletch@lamar.edu

Assistant Professors:

Dr. Eunjin Kwon, Hospitality Administration, (409) 880-7978, ekwon@lamar.edu

Instructor:

Charles Duit, Culinary Arts, (409) 880-8962, clduit@lamar.edu

Jill Killough, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8665, jill.killough@lamar.edu

Kristina May, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8051, kmay4@lamar.edu


Adjunct Instructors:

Willie Broussard, Hospitality Administration, (409) 880-8663, wjbroussard@lamar.edu

Dr. Jennifer Simmons, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8663, jpknoblauch@lamar.edu

Brenna Sleggs, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8663 bsleggs@lamar.edu

Jennifer Vincent, Family Studies, (409) 880-8663, jvincent4@lmar.edu

Bethany Williams, Nutrition & Dietetics, (409) 880-8663, bwilliams6@lamar.edu

 

Bachelor of Science - Family Studies

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Kimberly Wallet, (409) 880-8970, 124 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg, kawalletch@lamar.edu

Bachelor of Science in Family Studies

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Recognize the elements of healthy relationships and functioning through family research findings.
  2. Reduce family crises before they occur through awareness and prevention methods.
  3. Use an informed approach to help individuals, couples and families identify and build on their strengths.
  4. Strengthen communities by empowering individuals, couples and families to enrich their own well-being.

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in oral communication.
  2. Demonstrate a high level of cognitive and written proficiency in the identification and application of course content dealing with family-related issues through projects and assignments.
  3. Demonstrate mastery in their knowledge of theories related to Family Studies, and in their ability to make real-world applications of those theories.
Curriculum:

The Bachelor of Science in Family Studies is designed to meet the expanding higher education needs for those interested in the broad human services field, with particular focus on providing a strong foundation for students interested in careers in Marriage and Family Therapy, Family Wellness, Family Intervention, as well as Individual and Family Services thus creating a bridge between formal education and professional practice. Keeping with the mission of Lamar University, the program aims to enhance knowledge and skills of Family Studies and other social service professionals, helping them succeed in their aim of lifelong learning in a multicultural world

Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 120

Bachelor of Science - Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Certification

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Connie Ruiz, (409) 880-8668, 122 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg, ruizcs@lamar.edu

Bachelor of Science in Family & Consumer Sciences - Teacher Certification

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level teaching in the Family Consumer Sciences concentration.
  2. Demonstrate content knowledge in Family Consumer Sciences.
  3. Apply knowledge of problem-solving, creativity & critical thinking, and communication skills within the teaching profession.
Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Utilize and apply critical thinking skills
  2. Demonstrate effective written communication utilizing professional, reflective, and research-based styles
  3. Demonstrate effective professional oral communication and presentation skills


Curriculum:

The Bachelor of Science in Family Studies- Family & Consumer Sciences teacher certification program provides professional training for careers requiring technical knowledge of family and consumer sciences, as well as expertise in instructional methods.

Students must meet admission and certification requirements of the Lamar University Teacher Education Program. Several courses in the FCS Teacher Certification degree plan are taught through the Texas Family and Consumer Sciences Distance Education Alliance. The Alliance is a statewide network of Texas universities offering online courses to maximize educational resources through inter-institutional collaboration. During academic advising, students are made aware of Alliance course offerings.

Requirements of the Lamar University Teacher Education Program- Students that are Secondary Education and all level programs, the following applies:

  1. Completion of an admission application
  2. Successful completion of 45 semester hours, including PEDG 2310
  3. Successful completion of PEDG 2310 with a grade of "C" or better
  4. A minimum GPA overall and in the certificate field of 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale) with no grade lower than "C" in the certificate field(s)
  5. Successful completion of all sections of approved basic skills test or meet exceptions of the TSI assessment or an acceptable alternative test
  6. Approval following a criminal history review
  7. Filing a signed copy of the program's Professionalism Agreement
  8. Filing a signed copy of the Code of Ethics and Fitness to Teach Professionalism Policy
  9. Payment of a one-time non-refundable application fee of $75.00


Before applying to the teacher education program, a student must earn the credit hours for the subject they would like to teach.

 12 semester hours for the subject concentration (FCS-related content) Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 120"

Bachelor of Science in Fashion Merchandising

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Jill Killough, (409) 880-8663, 118 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg., jill.killough@lamar.edu

Bachelor of Science Fashion Merchandising

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Engage in life-long learning through continued advanced professional training and activities.
  2. Demonstrate leadership, participation, and problem solving in an evolving and collaborative global environment.
  3. Practice and apply ethical and culturally competent behaviors in a diverse in the workplace.
  4. Advance within the fashion merchandising profession as a leader through application of knowledge, skills, and experience.

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in both oral and visual presentation techniques.
  2. Evaluate and apply diverse perspectives to social and cultural systems in the business world relating to professional dress.
  3. Identify the methods used to shape garments to the human body, including the impact of fabric grain and the role of underlying fabrics and supporting devices in garments.
  4. Apply the personal selling component to the merchandise mix.
  5. Recognize the significance of visual merchandising to a promotional product
  6. Analyze patterns of change and predict future fashion trends based on findings.
  7. Identify and apply consumer responsibilities, obligations, and environmental issues relative to textile products.
  8. Apply knowledge and competencies of a successful retail buyer.
Curriculum:

The Bachelor of Science in Fashion Merchandising prepares graduates of the program with professional training for a wide range of careers in the fashion industry. The program courses integrate knowledge concepts and skills that prepare graduates for a fashion merchandising career in a variety of areas such as retail management, buying, visual merchandising, event coordination, styling, forecasting, promotion, and entrepreneurship.


Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 120

 

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Administration - General Hospitality

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Molly Dahm, (409) 880-1744, 128 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Building, molly.dahm@lamar.edu

General Hospitality


Program Educational Objectives

  1. Provide instruction of a quality and scope that will qualify students to work as supervisors and managers in the hospitality industry.
  2. Provide the necessary material resources, knowledge, facilities, and environment for students to obtain the marketable skills to succeed in the Hospitality industry.
  3. Participate in the activities of community organizations/businesses and develop a network of professionals who act as mentors for students in their learning experiences and provide employment opportunities in the field of hospitality.
  4. Encourage students’ interest and participation in scholarly research activities through group projects, independent study, and attendance at professional meetings and seminars.
  5. Attract, accommodate and support a diverse student population.
  6. Practice analytical and critical evaluation skills to be applied to real-life case resolution.


Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Critically examine, discuss, and demonstrate ethical decision-making that addresses stakeholder and organization needs.
  2. Demonstrate a high level of success in applying effective group work strategies by identifying the talents and skills of individuals to deliver the best product and service to targeted customers.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in analyzing hospitality market situations and financial positions and developing proactive business plans.
  4. Evaluate market conditions, customer needs, and the financial constraints and goals of a business situation in order to successfully position products and services in the market.
  5. Integrate practical and content knowledge and professional work attitudes in their applied field of practice.
  6. Apply general hospitality standards such as great service at a reasonable price in a designated period of time in any hospitality context.
  7. Mindfulness of using relevant and sensitive principles and tactics to address ethics– and diversity-based industry issues
Curriculum:

The philosophy that underpins LU’s Hospitality Administration program is meant to provide students with both technical- and content-based learning opportunities. The current undergraduate curriculum builds a knowledge and skill base that is rooted in everyday operational skills as well as managerial skills such as problem-solving and real-life accountability. Given the scope of the industry, students are exposed to a wide range of courses emphasizing everything from lodging and food and beverage management to event planning and meeting management to facilities management and tourism. Management courses in law, organizational behavior, human resources, marketing, and accounting are taught from a hospitality perspective so that students learn the unique challenges of the industry. Finally, the successful completion of a special group of courses permits additional certifications (18 hrs each) in the Hospitality Administration, Culinary Arts, and Event Management.


Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 122

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Administration - Culinary Arts

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Molly Dahm, (409) 880-1744, 128 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Building, molly.dahm@lamar.edu

Culinary Arts

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Provide instruction of a quality and scope that will qualify students to work as supervisors and managers in the hospitality industry.
  2. Provide the necessary material resources, knowledge, facilities, and environment for students to obtain the marketable skills to succeed in the Hospitality industry.
  3. Participate in the activities of community organizations/businesses and develop a network of professionals who act as mentors for students in their learning experiences and provide employment opportunities in the field of hospitality.
  4. Encourage students’ interest and participation in scholarly research activities through group projects, independent study, and attendance at professional meetings and seminars.
  5. Attract, accommodate and support a diverse student population.
  6. Practice analytical and critical evaluation skills to be applied to real-life case resolution.

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Critically examine, discuss, and demonstrate ethical decision-making that addresses stakeholder and organization needs.
  2. Demonstrate a high level of success in applying effective group work strategies by identifying the talents and skills of individuals to deliver the best product and service to targeted customers.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in analyzing hospitality market situations and financial positions and developing proactive business plans.
  4. Evaluate market conditions, customer needs, and the financial constraints and goals of a business situation in order to successfully position products and services in the market.
  5. Integrate practical and content knowledge and professional work attitudes in their applied field of practice.
  6. Apply general hospitality standards such as great service at a reasonable price in a designated period of time in any hospitality context.
  7. Mindfulness of using relevant and sensitive principles and tactics to address ethics– and diversity-based industry issues
Curriculum:

The philosophy that underpins LU’s Hospitality Administration program is meant to provide students with both technical- and content-based learning opportunities. The current undergraduate curriculum builds a knowledge and skill base that is rooted in everyday operational skills as well as managerial skills such as problem-solving and real-life accountability. Given the scope of the industry, students are exposed to a wide range of courses emphasizing everything from lodging and food and beverage management to event planning and meeting management to facilities management and tourism. Management courses in law, organizational behavior, human resources, marketing, and accounting are taught from a hospitality perspective so that students learn the unique challenges of the industry. Finally, the successful completion of a special group of courses permits additional certifications (18 hrs each) in the Hospitality Administration, Culinary Arts, and Event Management.

Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 120

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition

Program Coordinator:

Ms. Krissie May, (409) 880-8051, 123 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg., kmay4@lamar.edu

Nutrition

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Apply and be accepted for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.
  2. Demonstrate a strong understanding and appreciation of ethical standards as a result of instruction and experiences.
  3. Demonstrate a strong appreciation of diversity as a result of instruction and experiences.
  4. Increase cultural competence while in the program and during professional practice.
  5. Engage in lifelong learning.

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate how to locate, interpret, evaluate and use professional literature to make ethical, evidence-based practice decisions.
  2. Use current information technologies to locate and apply evidence-based guidelines and protocols.
  3. Apply critical thinking skills.
  4. Demonstrate effective and professional oral and written communication and documentation.
  5. Describe the governance of nutrition and dietetics practice, such as the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics; and describe interprofessional relationships in various practice settings.
  6. Assess the impact of a public policy position on nutrition and dietetics practice.
  7. Discuss the impact of health care policy and different health care delivery systems on food and nutrition services.
  8. Identify and describe the work of interprofessional teams and the roles of others with whom the registered dietitian nutritionist collaborates in the delivery of food and nutrition services.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural competence/sensitivity.
  10. Demonstrate identification with the nutrition and dietetics profession through activities such as participation in professional organizations and defending a position on issues impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession.
  11. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance and expectations of a professional in mentoring and precepting others.
  12. Use the Nutrition Care Process to make decisions, identify nutrition-related problems and determine and evaluate nutrition interventions.
  13. Develop an educational session or program/educational strategy for a target population.
  14. Demonstrate counseling and education methods to facilitate behavior change for and enhance wellness for diverse individuals and groups.
  15. Explain the processes involved in delivering quality food and nutrition services.
  16. Describe basic concepts of nutritional genomics.
  17. Apply management theories to the development of programs or services.
  18. Evaluate a budget and interpret financial data.
  19. Describe the regulation system related to billing and coding, what services are reimbursable by third-party payers, and how reimbursement may be obtained.
  20. Apply the principles of human resource management to different situations.
  21. Describe safety principles related to food, personnel and consumers.
  22. Analyze data for assessment and evaluate data to be used in decision-making for continuous quality improvement.


Curriculum:

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition- Dietetics accredited program prepares graduates for careers in nutrition, dietetics, and related fields to address issues of critical concern in the local, national, and international communities, ultimately contributing to the enhancement of human well-being. Students gain an appreciation of lifelong learning, ethical standards, and diversity. Upon completion of program course work, along with the Bachelor’s Degree, graduates are prepared for an accredited supervised practice program, leading to eligibility for the CDR (Commission on Dietetic Registration) credentialing exam. After passing the exam, the graduate is credentialed as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), may apply for licensure, if applicable, and is eligible for active membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 120

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition - Dietetics

Program Coordinator:

Ms. Krissie May, (409) 880-8051, 123 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg., kmay4@lamar.edu

Dietetics


Program Educational Objectives

  1. Apply and be accepted for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.
  2. Demonstrate a strong understanding and appreciation of ethical standards as a result of instruction and experiences.
  3. Demonstrate a strong appreciation of diversity as a result of instruction and experiences.
  4. Increase cultural competence while in the program and during professional practice.
  5. Engage in lifelong learning.

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate how to locate, interpret, evaluate and use professional literature to make ethical, evidence-based practice decisions.
  2. Use current information technologies to locate and apply evidence-based guidelines and protocols.
  3. Apply critical thinking skills.
  4. Demonstrate effective and professional oral and written communication and documentation.
  5. Describe the governance of nutrition and dietetics practice, such as the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics; and describe interprofessional relationships in various practice settings.
  6. Assess the impact of a public policy position on nutrition and dietetics practice.
  7. Discuss the impact of health care policy and different health care delivery systems on food and nutrition services.
  8. Identify and describe the work of interprofessional teams and the roles of others with whom the registered dietitian nutritionist collaborates in the delivery of food and nutrition services.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural competence/sensitivity.
  10. Demonstrate identification with the nutrition and dietetics profession through activities such as participation in professional organizations and defending a position on issues impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession.
  11. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance and expectations of a professional in mentoring and precepting others.
  12. Use the Nutrition Care Process to make decisions, identify nutrition-related problems and determine and evaluate nutrition interventions.
  13. Develop an educational session or program/educational strategy for a target population.
  14. Demonstrate counseling and education methods to facilitate behavior change for and enhance wellness for diverse individuals and groups.
  15. Explain the processes involved in delivering quality food and nutrition services.
  16. Describe basic concepts of nutritional genomics.
  17. Apply management theories to the development of programs or services.
  18. Evaluate a budget and interpret financial data.
  19. Describe the regulation system related to billing and coding, what services are reimbursable by third-party payers, and how reimbursement may be obtained.
  20. Apply the principles of human resource management to different situations.
  21. Describe safety principles related to food, personnel and consumers.
  22. Analyze data for assessment and evaluate data to be used in decision-making for continuous quality improvement.


Curriculum:

Effective January 1, 2024, the minimum degree requirement for eligibility to take the registration examination for dietitians will change from a bachelor’s degree to a graduate degree. All other didactic and supervised practice eligibility requirements will remain the same.

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition- Dietetics accredited program prepares graduates for careers in nutrition, dietetics, and related fields to address issues of critical concern in the local, national, and international communities, ultimately contributing to the enhancement of human well-being. Students gain an appreciation of lifelong learning, ethical standards, and diversity. Upon completion of program course work, along with the Bachelor’s Degree, graduates are prepared for an accredited supervised practice program, leading to eligibility for the CDR (Commission on Dietetic Registration) credentialing exam. After passing the exam, the graduate is credentialed as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), may apply for licensure, if applicable, and is eligible for active membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Suggested Program of Study – Total Min. Hours: 120

Minor in Culinary Arts

The Hospitality Administration & Culinary Arts program within the Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services offers the following 21-hour minor (12 hours upper level) for non-majors for inclusion in degree programs by students in other programs or departments.

The Culinary Arts minor aims to provide students with both technical- and content-based learning opportunities. The current undergraduate curriculum builds a knowledge and skill base through the application of techniques in culinary arts.

HOSP 1301 - Chef's Essentials

HOSP 1315 - Basic Foods

HOSP 2324 - Commercial Food Production I

HOSP 3315 - Restaurant Applications

HOSP 3324 - Commercial Food Production II (or Upper-level HOSP elective)

HOSP 3360 - Quality Food Management

HOSP 3372 - Menu and Service Management

 

Hours: 21

 

Minor in Event Planning

Event Planning Minor = 18 hours

The Hospitality Administration & Culinary Arts program within the Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services offers the following 18-hour minor (12 hours upper level) for non-majors for inclusion in degree programs by students in other programs or departments.

The Event Planning minor aims to provide students with both technical- and content-based learning opportunities. The current undergraduate curriculum builds a knowledge and skill base that is rooted in everyday operational skills as well as managerial skills focused on event planning.

HOSP 1315 - Basic Foods

HOSP 2324 - Commercial Food Production I

HOSP 3372 - Menu and Service Management

HOSP 3376 - Convention and Meeting Management

HOSP 3377 - Event Management

HOSP 4314 - Hospitality Marketing

 Hours: 18

Minor in Family Studies

The Family Studies program within the Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services offers the following 18-hour minor (9 hours upper level) for non-majors for inclusion in degree programs by students in other programs or departments.

The Family Studies minor aims to enhance knowledge and skills for those interested in the broad human services field, with a particular focus on providing a strong foundation for students interested in careers in Marriage and Family Therapy; Family Wellness; Family Intervention; and Individual and Family Services

FMST 1377 - Intimate Relationships

FMST 2316 - Community Resources

FMST Electives - 12 Hours (at least 9 must be upper-level)

 

Hours: 18

Minor in Fashion Merchandising

The Fashion Merchandising program within the Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services offers the following 18-hour minor (12 hours upper level) for non-majors for inclusion in degree programs by students in other programs or departments.

The minor in Fashion Merchandising aims to integrate conceptual knowledge and professional skills that prepare graduates for the fashion merchandising industry.

FASH 1320 - Textiles

FASH 2385 - Intro to Fashion Retailing

FASH 3370 - Fashion Promotion and Visual Merchandising

FASH 4325 - Fashion History II

FASH 4336 - Merchandise Buying and Management

FASH 4346 - Social-Psychology of Apparel

 

Hours: 18

Minor in Hospitality Administration

The Hospitality Administration & Culinary Arts program within the Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services offers the following 18-hour minor (12 hours upper level) for non-majors for inclusion in degree programs by students in other programs or departments.

The Hospitality minor aims to provide students with both technical- and content-based learning opportunities. The current undergraduate curriculum builds a knowledge and skill base that is rooted in everyday operational skills as well as managerial skills such as problem-solving and real-life accountability

HOSP 1372 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

HOSP 1374 - Hotel Management

HOSP 3317 - Hotel Front Office Management

HOSP 3376 - Convention and Meeting Management

HOSP 4312 - Hospitality Law

HOSP 4314 - Hospitality Marketing

 

Hours: 18

Minor in Nutrition

The Nutrition program within the Department of Nutrition, Hospitality & Human Services offers the following 18-hour minor (12 hours upper level) for non-majors for inclusion in degree programs by students in other programs or departments.

The Nutrition minor aims to increase knowledge and skill for those interested in improving the nutritional health of individuals or groups across the lifecycle.

NUTR 1322 - Basic Nutrition

NUTR 3316 - Nutrition and Fitness

NUTR 3328 - Community Nutrition

NUTR 4307 - Nutrition Through the Life Cycle

6 Hours approved Electives

 

Hours: 18

Nutrition Communication Certificate

Nutrition Communication

This certificate focuses on the integration of nutrition and communication knowledge to provide accurate and cohesive nutrition messaging through a variety of media platforms. It will also provide students with an interdisciplinary approach in gaining the knowledge and skills necessary to properly disseminate nutrition education information.

The certificate will provide a distinctive opportunity to increase students' knowledge areas not traditionally addressed in individual disciplines.

NUTR 1322 - Basic Nutrition

NUTR 4307 - Nutrition through the Life Cycle

One from

NUTR 3316 - Nutrition and Fitness
NUTR 3328 - Community Nutrition
COMM 3362 - Public Relations Writing

COMM 4383 - Persuasion

One from:

COMM 4397 Media Projects
COMM 4396 - Studies in Media: Health Communication

Master of Science in Hospitality Leadership

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Eunjin Kwon, (409) 880-7978, 114 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg ekwon@lamar.edu

 
Master of Science, Hospitality Leadership


Program Educational Objectives

  1.  .Graduates will demonstrate professional and ethical leadership (career progression, leadership positions, change initiatives, and more).
  2. Graduates will draw upon management theory, principles, and case study evaluations to successfully address hospitality leadership challenges using cogent action plans.
  3. Graduates will utilize evidence-based research and sustained involvement in the hospitality industry to build a proactive research agenda and to actively engage in lifelong learning

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1.  Demonstrate analytical and critical evaluation skills to be applied to both real-life case resolution and written research.
  2. Critically evaluate the intersection of scholarly literature and current industry practice with an eye to developing a personal and professional research agenda.
  3. Utilize management theories, frameworks, and tactics to address ethics– and diversity-based issues and institute plans and practices to successfully address contemporary industry issues.
  4. Integrate personal experience derived from real-life challenges into the leadership process, employing evidence-based practices and customer service research

Curriculum:

The MS in Hospitality Leadership curriculum includes 18 hours in Leadership; 9 hours in Hospitality research; and 3 hours in a capstone experience. In addition, the curriculum prepares and advances students for careers in hospitality and/or hospitality-related fields by developing marketable skills including leadership, vision, communication, maturity, commitment, integrity, and sensitivity; it also positions graduates to become leaders in the hospitality industry. Throughout the curriculum, the emphasis is placed on ethical standards and diversity issues. More specifically, the curriculum is designed to reflect the changing dynamics in the hospitality industry such as the impact of climate change, the power of social media, and the issues related to sustainability of resources.

MS in Hospitality Leadership culminates with the Hospitality Capstone course where students have the opportunity to integrate content knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. This concluding experience is designed to expand students’ capacity to solve a real-life problem by synthesizing evidence-based research into proactive evidence-based practices.

Master of Science in Nutrition

Program Coordinator:

Dr. Amy Shows, (409) 880-7962, 126 Nutrition, Hospitality and Human Services Bldg, amy.shows@lamar.edu

 
Master of Science, Nutrition


Program Educational Objectives

  1. Interpret and evaluate current nutrition literature.
  2. Increase cultural competence to integrate healthy food choices into diverse food patterns.
  3. Evaluate and present appropriate nutrition guidelines to individuals with unique nutrition needs.
  4. Develop marketable and lifelong learning skills.

Program Student Outcomes

Upon program completion, graduates will be able to:

  1. Develop a research proposal using evidence-based practice, thus communicate effectively in writing.
  2. Provide a Case Study Presentation using appropriate evidence-based nutrition guidelines, thus communicate effectively orally.
  3. Develop a Professional Portfolio, thus show evidence of planning for life-long learning.

Curriculum:

The MS in Nutrition curriculum includes 3 hours in Nutrition Research; 6 hours in Nutrition and Metabolism; 15 hours in Community and Lifecycle Nutrition; 9 hours in Contemporary Nutrition; and 3 hours in a capstone experience. In addition, the curriculum prepares students for careers in nutrition and/or nutrition-related fields by developing marketable skills including leadership, flexibility, maturity, dedication, dependability, and enthusiasm; it also positions graduates to become agents of nutrition promotion and intervention. The curriculum provides graduates with advanced knowledge and skills to succeed as administrators in community nutrition programs offering lifecycle services in pregnancy, infancy, and aging. Throughout the curriculum, the emphasis is placed on interventions that promote nutritional health and prevent chronic diseases that are nutrition-related; and, the recognition of underserved populations and those at high risk of diet-related diseases, nutrient deficiencies, hunger and malnutrition. In addition to the Nutrition Research course, every course requires students to read research from the current literature and apply findings. The curriculum provides opportunities for students to critique study designs, strengths, and limitations. The MS in Nutrition culminates with the Nutrition Capstone course where students have the opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. This concluding experience is designed to expand students’ capacity to master new content, think critically, and develop life-long learning skills across the disciplines of nutrition and community health.

Please Note: This master's degree does not provide the requirements for the Didactic Program in Dietetics, provide eligibility to apply to a dietetic internship, nor the eligibility to sit for the National Registration examination to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Admission Requirements

Bachelor's Degree: Undergraduate degree from an accredited university with an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher or a 2.75 GPA in the last 60 hours of undergraduate coursework
Minimum 2.5 Undergraduate GPA