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Higher education magazine ranks LU among nation’s best

Lamar University has been ranked No. 1 in the nation for graduating Hispanic master’s degree students in education for the second consecutive year by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine.  The national education magazine, in its June 7 issue, also ranked Lamar among the top 10 universities nationwide in six additional categories.

They include, fifth for total number of minority graduate students in education, fifth for the most Asian American master’s graduates in physical sciences and sixth in the nation for the most Asian American master’s graduates in communication disorders.  The annual rankings also recognized Lamar as the seventh highest institution for graduating the most African American master’s degree students in education, ninth for Hispanic master’s graduates in all disciplines and ninth nationwide for Native American graduate students in education.

"We are very proud of our faculty and staff, whose collective commitment to diversity, a Lamar University core value and a central component of our strategic plan, has once again resulted in national recognition, as well as our designation as one of the most diverse campuses in the country,” said Stephen Doblin, LU provost and vice president for academic affairs.  “As a Carnegie Doctoral Research University, Lamar is committed to both the participation and success of all our students; to include our graduate students, and especially our graduate students of color."

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education is the leading national education magazine devoted to issues concerning minorities in higher education.  The annual rankings are the most comprehensive compilation of statistical data identifying the Top 100 four-year universities awarding degrees to minority students.  The data are compiled in partnership with researchers at Indiana University and Purdue University.  The rankings are included in a three-part national report documenting the ability of U.S. universities to award undergraduate and graduate degrees to minority students.